A new report from local officials details what happened the day actor Jeremy Renner was hurt in a snowplow accident. 

NBC News obtained the Jan. 1 incident report from Washoe County Sheriff’s Office on Jan. 25.

The report shows Renner towed his nephew’s truck out of the snow at his Reno, Nevada, property on a private road.

The plow, called a Pistenbully, started sliding down a hill so Renner got out but without putting the emergency brake on, the report says. The plow — which runs on a track — was then sliding toward his nephew, who was in his truck. 

The report says Renner tried to step up on the track to divert the plow or stop it. 

“Renner was pulled under the Pistenbully, and the track rolled over him,” the report says. “Renner suffered injuries to his torso, extremities, face and head.”

The report also says there were some mechanical issues with the truck, but it’s believed that the parking brake would’ve stopped the plow from moving forward.

The 52-year-old actor was hospitalized on New Year’s Day following the incident. In a post to his Instagram last week, he wrote a long update on his condition.

Thanking his fans, he said that his “workouts, resolutions all changed this particular new years.”

“Spawned from tragedy for my entire family and quickly focused into united actionable love,” he wrote. “These 30 plus broken bones will mend, grow stronger, just like the love and bond with family and friends deepens.”

The PistenBully snowplow weighs at least 7 tons, Washoe County Sheriff Darin Balaam said at a news conference after the accident.

Neighbors helped as he waited 40 minutes for first responders to arrive because of weather conditions, Balaam said at the time.

“What I can tell you was there was no doctor on scene,” Balaam shared. “It was some good neighbors… that came out with some towels and rendered some aid.”

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